A Simple Guide To Griffintown & Little Burgundy

The two side-by-side neighborhoods of Griffintown and Little Burgundy may differ in ambiance and history, but both are creative hubs and destinations for food and drink. They are also two of Montreal’s most popular residential areas, just a hop away from Old Town, making them ideal for travelers looking to experience daily life in the Quebec metropolis.

Griffintown and Little Burgundy (La Petit Bourgogne), two vibrant sibling districts located between downtown Montreal and Saint-Henri, have a unique character that cannot be ignored.Griffintown and Little Burgundy are two of three districts in the Les Quartiers du Canal Districts and Saint-Henri (on the west side of Little Burgundy) is two of three.

Griffin Town’s rapidly changing urban landscape is the result of continued development. The area was once home to chocolate mills, power companies and steel mills, but in recent years small tracts of the city have been converted to residential areas. Modern high-rise apartments are now mixed in with traditional low-rise buildings, and developers have converted warehouse space into residential buildings. The thriving arts scene has put Griffintown at the forefront of creativity, and with the construction of three public parks, it’s no surprise that the area has become one of Montreal’s most sought-after areas.

Little Burgundy is one of the most multicultural areas in Montreal, home to more than 80 different ethnic groups. Its past also belonged to industry, but the area was also once a jazz center in the city. Due to the influx of musicians who flocked to Little Burgundy during the Prohibition era, it has been dubbed the “Harlem of the North” and is known as the jazz capital of Canada. Nightclubs dot the streets, welcoming legends like Frank Sinatra and Dizzy Gillespie. Although these jazz clubs no longer exist, there are still plenty of reasons to linger in the area. Those reasons include Atwater Market – a foodie’s dream come true – and a plethora of gourmet eateries like the famous Joe Beef, a lively steak and seafood restaurant where weekday tables can require reservations at least two months in advance.

The Atwater Market is one of the most popular places in Montreal where you can buy fresh produce, meats, cheeses, baked goods, and anything you want or want to eat (be aware that you’ll be craving it while you’re shopping). Located on the edge of Little Burgundy, on the border of Saint-Henri, this market offers some of the most impressive seasonal food in Montreal. The building is an Art Deco gem and one of the most beautiful buildings in the city, open year round.

Both boroughs are close to the Lachine Canal, the heart of the city’s southwestern region and a historic waterway that flows through the city’s southwest, so the outdoors is never far away. Local guide and Montreal expert Thom Seivewright explained that factory workers once lived in communities along the canal.” The canal is the essence of these hoods,” he said.” Without it, they would not exist.”

The Lachine Canal is a unique outdoor retreat where Montrealers can walk, jog, jog, rollerblade, bike on the waterfront greenery, or kayak and cruise the canal in a battery car. The land bypassing the waterway is also a hotbed of real estate, with Redpath Lofts (named after Scottish immigrant and sugar tycoon John Redpath) once a sugar mill, now a luxury apartment overlooking the canal. Other multi-story residential projects have completed construction, and several more are in the works. Undoubtedly, the next five years will see a new face of the Lachine Canal unfold.

According to Seivewright, although Griffintown and Little Burgundy have different architectural styles, both “share a common industrial history, a fashionable present, and a surely prosperous future.” In addition to the various activities on the waterfront, these two districts have some of Montreal’s best food, shopping and nightlife. Notre-Dame Street West is filled with antique galleries, trendy restaurants, cafes and one-of-a-kind boutiques. The side streets are also full of hidden treasures, so don’t miss them as you wander through the neighborhoods.

Hotel

At the Alt Hotel (120 Peel St), modern loft-style rooms are reminiscent of Griffintown’s industrial spirit. High ceilings, exposed concrete, workstations, and a plethora of electronic device connection points. A down comforter wrapped around a comfy bed and a spa shower add to the luxury. The hotel also has a fully equipped gym and small terrace, and a grab-and-go corner in the lobby for breakfast, lunch and snacks. Located in Griffintown, this hotel offers a wide range of amenities and services.

For a chic hotel with more of a B&B flair, try L’Hotel Particulier (1200 Ottawa), a chic B&B converted from an 1865 brick row house. All three apartments and two suites have their own entrances, so it’s easy to imagine yourself living in a cool apartment in Montreal. This hotel is defined as a “micro-accommodation” because the rooms can be easily reconfigured to accommodate larger gatherings, making it an obvious choice for groups and families. A 300-year-old fireplace and rotating artwork add a sense of history and charm to the hotel. The secluded, lush private gardens are the biggest highlight of this hotel.

Diet

Foxy (1638 Notre-Dame St W) is a focal point for wood- and grilled foods, but don’t let that stop you from trying oysters with onion mignonette or chipotle and lime ceviche.Meat lovers can opt for perfectly cooked steaks with romesco sauce, but don’t overlook fish dishes like cucumber and celery with sea bass. An apple and almond tart is served with a scoop of avocado cream caramel ice cream. Paradise.

Seasonal ingredients are sourced from local farms, and Chef John Winter Russell uses them all at Candide (551 Rue Saint-Martin). Located in an old church, this sophisticated restaurant has a casual interior with red brick walls, wood paneling and an open kitchen, but the simple plates created by the culinary team are full of flavor and texture. The new Nordic inspiration fuels the restaurant’s four-course menu of fruits, vegetables and grains, which rotates once a month.

Grinder Viandes & Vins (1708 Notre Dame St W) features tartar, foie gras, salad, fresh seafood, and a variety of meats.Surf & Turf is the specialty here, so expect big, juicy steaks and juicy lobster, shrimp, and scallops. Here, you can pair shellfish with dry white wines like the Geschickt 2015 Riesling, or try a Ca’ del Baio Vallegrande 2013 Barbaresco with an unpretentious New York steak.

Le Vin Papillon (2519 Notre Dame St W) is one of Joe Beef’s sister stores. While the selection of natural wines here is excellent, you’ll have to order a small plate to go with your wine due to licensing laws. You can choose from ricotta cheese and peas (spread on thickly toasted bread), or mouth-watering sturgeon and fried gnocchi (a home cooked dish). Finish with a smoky smoky carrot eclair.There is no menu here, instead look at the chalkboard on the wall with the list of dishes for the day. To avoid long lines, it’s best to arrive early when the doors open at 4pm.

Every neighborhood needs a local drink shop, and in this part of Montreal, it’s the Lord William Pub (265 Rue des Seigneurs). The tavern, located at Caledonia Ironworks Co. Nachos and poutine are ideal appetizers, while main courses range from Egyptian falafel to fish and chips to lamb burgers. There’s plenty of room inside and outside this bar to relax with a drink and a bite.

Le Bete a Pain (195 Rue Young) is the translation of The Bread Beast, which makes some of Montreal’s best carbohydrate foods, including baguettes, baguettes, baklava and Seattle bread, as well as doughnuts, donuts, croissants and more. This cafe also serves breakfast, salads and sandwiches from afternoon to evening, as well as local beer and a glass of wine. The quaint dining space is buzzing with locals enjoying a coffee or a meal with friends.

Art.

At the corner of Rue Guy and Rue Saint-Jacques, a mural entitled “Hommage à la Petite Bourgogne” covers the protective wall of the Guy substation and is not to be missed. Urban artist Roadsworth (Peter Gibson) is from Toronto, but lives in Montreal, where he pays homage to the history of Little Burgundy with a bold colour collage. Look for references to industry, jazz, art and culture in this public project, which was originally proposed to revitalize this section of town.

Artwork

At the corner of Rue Guy and Rue Saint-Jacques, a mural entitled “Hommage à la Petite Bourgogne” covers the protective wall of the Guy substation and is not to be missed. Urban artist Roadsworth (Peter Gibson) is from Toronto, but lives in Montreal, where he pays homage to the history of Little Burgundy with a bold colour collage. Look for references to industry, jazz, art and culture in this public project, which was originally proposed to revitalize this section of town.

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